58 thoughts on “FROSTY RETURNS

      1. As a rather shy person, I would never in a million years get out in public and dance and prance around…unless it was incognito. Little kids love Frosty, and want to hug the character and shake hands. very cool.

        Like

      2. As an odd mix of introvert and extrovert, I quite like dancing…and pontificating. Once a teacher always a teacher, right? But I do know what you mean. ๐Ÿ™‚

        Like

    1. This photo was on the front page of the newspaper I worked for, along with several more shots inside. It was back in the 70s. I have also been known to walk down the street in high-heels back in my Girl Scout leader days. Memorial Day (May)there was always a big parade appropriate for towns Imagine that! My husband was fire chief, so he always rode in the main fire truck. He isn’t quite in this photo (nor the fire truck) there were multiple wonderful costumes…Santa, reindeers, 3 little pigs, wolf, etc. that we (the city) rented for the occasion. Very good costumes made of fleece and the heads were made of paper-mache and were roomy and cool.

      Like

      1. I think all little kids love marching around to music, part of the regimen that molds little kids into good citizens that follow rules like: no running, no spitting, no punching… ๐Ÿ™‚

        Like

      2. -giggles- I never did any of those things! My Mum would have had heart failure. I think I just liked the moving to the beat. Then again, I didn’t exactly fit in with the other kids so….

        Like

      3. We have a “winter wonderland” outside, damp sticky snow all over trees and branches. I like that look. However I do not enjoy the holiday hoopla any more, as if I ever really did. I half-enjoyed it when my kids were little, decorating and making stuff. But here it is the 22nd already and I have not sent anything to my Minnesota contingent, and not only that…I am dragging my feet about local activities. :-{ bah humbug…

        Like

      4. lol – if it makes you feel any better, I’m another ‘bah humbug’. Since the kids have grown up, xmas has become lighter each year. This year is probably the least christmassy yet. No tree, just a few gifts wrapped [for a couple of littlies], and sensible, ‘functional’ gifts for the Offspring. I do have a nice Christmas Eve dinner planned [European tradition] but I only just made the chocolate mousse for the cake last night. -sigh- Not motivated, I’m afraid.

        Like

      5. come to think of it, I have some Holly shrubs, and I hear they are covered with red berries…the “stud-holly” that is. I can’t really see that part of the yard without actually going out there. I have photos of the plants when they have just green leaves, and later when there are lots of little blossoms. I’ll have to go out there and get some berry-pics.

        Like

      6. hmm, I think January, but our weather is very unpredictable because of the Lake Erie, and we always have a “lake effect” conditions. Daughter3 lives up along the “snow belt” heading up toward Pennsylvania and New York. We live about 15 miles inland from the coast, the lake itself is about 30 miles wide at that point, and the border with Canada is approx. mid-way of the lake on an island.

        Like

      7. Oh wow, that is a long way north. I understand about the lake effect though. Melbourne is a coastal city so the weather is always much milder than further in land. Don’t think I could survive living in areas where 40 plus temps are ‘common’. :/

        Like

      8. Our government is closed down, partially; all government workers (mail carriers, military, nurses and other VA employees. Our 45 said that while they are not getting their paychecks they should make up the difference by doing odd jobs like carpentry or car repairs or whatever. Really….the National Parks are closed, which always ticks off people. I think the mail is running, but I’m not sure why they wouldn’t be in the no-pay group.

        Like

      9. We’ve all been watching. Another blogger pointed out that 2 cases being brought against 45 have had to be postponed because of the shutdown. Funny that.

        Like

      10. Outrageous! We sure do live in interesting times, don’t we? The National Parks are closed, which always causes a ruckus…the park itself is there of course and accessible, but toilets and other niceties are shut down. Park-users are screaming, but they are taking advantage of free admission. ๐Ÿ™‚

        Like

      11. I am so glad the holidays are almost over. We never did much on New Years Eve or Day, although as a teenager I thought NY Eve was THE epitome of romance and sophistication, and could hardly wait to turn 21 so I could experience that glamour. Ha ha…I have always been a dreamer.

        Like

      12. We here went metric about then, but my fellow countrymen raised so much hell about having road signs with duo measurements that they stopped doing it. I once wrote a series for the paper about the metric system, and concluded that “some children are learning metric system from some teachers…more or less a voluntary subject.” We have since then had 2-liter pop (soda) bottles and duo-measures on canned goods and bottles. I don’t know the criteria for learning the metric system now, I should ask my great-grandchildren.

        Like

      13. When I was at the community college I tried two years when a row to take cross-country skiing, but there was not enough snow for it. They had snow-fencing up, which collected a very small strip of snow around the fence…not much fun.

        Like

      14. I think X-Country Skiing would be a great skill to have, the taste of it that I had was great fun. Daughter 3 was quite a down-hill skier in her teen years according to her friends at the time. They belonged to a high school ski club. I am too much of a coward to even think about racing down big hills on skiis.

        Like

      15. On the other hand I have some great photos of the enormous snow drifts one year when the kids were 7-8-9 and my husband plowed the driveway and built the drifts even higher. They had wonderful caves and tunnels dug out.

        Like

      16. indeed…wonderland it can be…beautiful, but it can be treacherous. I said before that I learned to drive on snow, and to this day “rules of driving on ice” come back to me when I โ€ฆ uh, drive on ice.

        Like

      17. I have taken some tumbles in my life, though now I try to be careful. Fortunately I have my car in the garage, and destination places usually have their lots cleared of snow and have salted the ice.

        Like

      18. One winter back in about 1948 I vividly remember the gorgeous snow piled everywhere, my Dad and the other men in the neighborhood waded down the middle of the road to get to the grocery store. (They loved it!) and I stood in the dining room staring out the window at my brother, out “wrecking” the perfect snow…and me sick with the flu or whatever and so sad because I couldn’t go outside. ๐Ÿ™‚ Another winter after we had TV…about 1952 I guess, the news channel announcers were “snowed in” for about three days, unable to leave so they worked round the clock….I was SO impressed with that! The police were delivering milk to families with babies, and the hospitals were full of people in accidents or whatever.

        Like

      19. Since I was born and raised around here, I’m used to snow. I learned to drive on snow, which can be hazardous. Today it is going up to almost 60F, I have photos of my late Bob outside pointing to a thermometer showing 70+ degrees, with a calendar showing December in his other hand. There is never any really unusual weather in this part of Ohio, although we do have noteworthy extremes. In approx. 1990 the temps hit -22 (yep, minus 22 degrees) and remained below Zero for two entire weeks.

        Like

      20. Wow, that is a massive extreme! We never hit 0 [freezing] but even in the coastal cities, the temp. can hit 41-42 C. I guess we get the hot end of the stick.

        Like

      21. That comes with being South of the Equator? We usually do hit Zero at least once a winter, and the hottest I can think of that I personally felt was a few years ago in Arizona when it was 120 F. I was dashing around like an ass and finally realized it was super hot…duh. Both my sons were born in Arizona, and once I think it was about 106. That is not unusual. It is very dry in Arizona, being as how it is in the middle of a desert.

        Like

      22. 120 F is not extreme, especially for the Arizona and California desert area. Even here where we live in Ohio it reaches 100 F in summer, rarely goes higher than 102 F maybe. That is damn hot, because the humidity is merciless, because of the lake I suppose. In Arizona humidity is much lower. The day Son1 was born in Tucson, Arizona, it was 106 F. I was sitting outside under the carport and thinking about how it was adequately-comfortable and cringing at how terrible it would be at home (Ohio) at that temp because of the humidity.

        Like

Comments are closed.