Memorial to Aborigines, photo by my Cousin Greg

My Cousin Greg Towner posted this photo on his facebook page.   Thanks Greg! Chatting with an Australian friend this morning, I mentioned this memorial and she asked if I could post it on my blog.    It strikes me as humorous that I am a go-between two Australians, here literally on the other side of the world.    Greg  has written and published some … Continue reading Memorial to Aborigines, photo by my Cousin Greg

Why is it called Latin America? (re-blog with new title)

Q 1 —Why do we hear so little about countries in Central and South America? Q 2 — Do citizens of all Latin American nations speak Spanish? Q 3 — What was the Treaty of Tordesillas?         Q. Why do we hear so little about Latin American countries?   For one thing, we Americans tend to get our news from a relative … Continue reading Why is it called Latin America? (re-blog with new title)

Politics – do we really care? Re-blogged from Meeka’s Mind

Originally posted on Meeka's Mind:
I’ve always had a problem with ‘-isms’ – communism, socialism, facism, capitalism, republicanism, you name it – because they all seem to miss the point about people. Homo Sapiens doesn’t give a flying fruit bat about politics until things go wrong. I was a kid in the late Menzies era of Australia [1949-1966], and I remember hearing some adults… Continue reading Politics – do we really care? Re-blogged from Meeka’s Mind

not your granny’s Columbus Day…

http://theoatmeal.com/comics/columbus_day This article is excellent on the subject of Christopher Columbus and the “discovery of America.” It is well worth the read, and deserves an A+ for research and attribution, factual information based partially on bona fide original sources including Columbus’s own writing. Bartolomé de Las Casas,  Dominican Friar and later Bishop, is the author of The Destruction of the Indies, which details the systematic horror … Continue reading not your granny’s Columbus Day…

Of Statues and Soldiers…

Why are angry mobs allowed to destroy Civil War statues?      If they have to be taken down, properly and carefully by local government authorities—why not store them temporarily at a museum or some other place appropriate.     Smashing them to rubble is foolish…no, let me say stupid…and knee-jerk reactions to political correctness.   Gratuitous pandering, perhaps. Except for one thing—there seems to be NO thought or reasoning … Continue reading Of Statues and Soldiers…

Johnson’s Island, Confederate officers prison on Lake Erie, Ohio (Part Two)

(all photos on this page © Sometimes, 2017)   These photos were taken in May 1981 by Bob Dreger, my late husband. The island prison housed Confederate military officers who were originally  captured during Civil War battles, and imprisoned  at Camp Chase, Columbus Ohio.   The object was to separate the officers from the rank-and-file soldiers and house them in the Northern prison where they remained until … Continue reading Johnson’s Island, Confederate officers prison on Lake Erie, Ohio (Part Two)

Johnson’s Island confederate cemetery on Lake Erie, Ohio….photos of Southern soldier statue (Part One)

Here are two photos of the statue at Johnson’s Island, Ohio, taken by Bob Dreger in 1981.   The cemetery is a protected U.S. site, where more than two hundred Confederate military officers are buried.    I do need to clarify that Bob Dreger was the photographer, in 1981.  The copyright  is ©Sometimes, 2017. This island is far North, half way to Canada.   It was important because … Continue reading Johnson’s Island confederate cemetery on Lake Erie, Ohio….photos of Southern soldier statue (Part One)

FYI about the Khan Sheikoun affair for open-minders, from the Huffington Post

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/syria-chemical-attack-al-qaeda-played-donald-trump_us_58ea226fe4b058f0a02fca4d Even for readers who already have their minds made up owe it to themselves to read this detailed Huffington Post article by Scott Ritter, and to add it to all available sources of information.     Here is a great example of “Alternate Facts,” in a logical sense of being mixed information from different sources, that as a whole may lead to knowledge of what really … Continue reading FYI about the Khan Sheikoun affair for open-minders, from the Huffington Post

a primer of selective History

Please open your books to page twenty-four the teacher instructed, one morning … look at the  ladies’ dressed in their finery, feel free to smile at feathers and bustles, and laugh out loud at the shoes! Now let’s skip ahead to Chapter Seven, where more ladies are seen at their work, the clothing they wear is of buckskin, embellished with feathers and beads (and pride,) … Continue reading a primer of selective History

STILL GOT YOUR SOCKS ON? THIS WILL SCARE THE BEJEEZUS OUT OF MOST ANYONE! (from the Washington Post)

  https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/president-elect-donald-trump-is-about-to-learn-the-nations-deep-secrets/2016/11/12/8bf9bc40-a847-11e6-8fc0-7be8f848c492_story.html?wpisrc=nl_rainbow&wpmm=1   OK….I admit it…I’m scared! There are people that I know very well, family members, friends, acquaintenaces from various times of my life who snicker or sneer at my fears.    They say I am of the “old school”—the “Cold War era”—afraid of bogies and ghosts of the past, as gifted us from the best selling authors of Spy Fiction.    You know—Tom Clancey et al. … Continue reading STILL GOT YOUR SOCKS ON? THIS WILL SCARE THE BEJEEZUS OUT OF MOST ANYONE! (from the Washington Post)

childhood memories of war

Perhaps the most vivid memories of nursery tales were not of bunnies or bantering fairies…but of War and its aftermath.     We here in the United States did not suffer the horrors that children in other countries did, the bombings and air raids and worse.   But such accounts were very much vicariously present.    And directly following the Hot War followed the Cold War, with its insidious psychological terror. I … Continue reading childhood memories of war

My Favorite Novels

The Name of the Rose, Humberto Eco.    (I love this book, have read it at least three times, its about a monastery library in the 12th Century.) Snow Treasure, Marie McSwigan (All-time favorite.   My third grade Christmas present.  About some Norwegian kids and German soldiers.) The Last Juror, Robert Grisham  (I like Grisham, this is my favorite novel of his.) Wake of the Red Witch, … Continue reading My Favorite Novels

So which are YOUR Top Ten Fiction Novels?

Please take out pencil and a piece of paper.      Number from one to 10.   (It doesn’t matter what kind of paper, and the numbers should be 1-10 in a vertical column.)     You are to list (not necessarily in order) YOUR  top ten Greatest Fiction Books Ever Written.      You have 30 minutes to complete the list. Wow!      Moments ago I read a page on selling books on eBay.    … Continue reading So which are YOUR Top Ten Fiction Novels?

Taco Trucks…what a great idea!

The idea of “Taco Trucks on every corner” is not a bad idea.     Food trucks, in general, are popular in areas such as college campuses, factories, various community events.  At the University of Akron, when I was there ten years ago, there was a guy with his food truck selling Gyros.   For anyone who has been asleep for years, Gyros are yummy sandwich sort of … Continue reading Taco Trucks…what a great idea!

Lament for lost words…or where did that #$%^* Post GO?

Once when I was a grad student taking a mandatory Historiography class I lost my final exam essay. It was written and ready to print for handing it in to the professor the next morning. It was late at night (isn’t it always?) and I was too tired to take the time involved in dealing with the printer, all bleary-eyed from cramming for finals. I … Continue reading Lament for lost words…or where did that #$%^* Post GO?