Beginnings, a poem re-blogged from Paul F. Lenzi’s poseypluspolemics

 

One of my favorite poets, Paul F. Lenzi, of poesypluspolemics blog, included the Reblog button with his fascinating and most inspiring works of sheer genius of words…no need to ask me twice.  🙂  The Hubble Telescope shot is also breathtaking. Thanks Paul.

Poesy plus Polemics

pillars “Pillars of Creation” – Photo by Hubble Telescope

Secrets of creation hide deep in conflation
Of science with faith, of corpus with wraith,
Discrete bits of essence, immune from senescence,
That mark each warm creature, or cold lifeless feature,
Of all the known world, plus those unknown, thus hurled
Through vastness of space, push-pulled in their chase
By grave forces, unseen, save by eyes utmost keen
As detectors of naught, who find nothingness caught
By the physics of sleight, in mathematical light,
Racing outward, away from a focal array,
From a radiant heart that outburst apart
With the first stroke of time, Divine in its prime.

Before that release, all was soundless still peace,
When all matter, all dust, was consigned to the trust
Of that heart, then mere speck, the one salient check
Against stark eternity, charged with modernity,
Then, slowly it swelled, its inertia unquelled,
Now a tumescent…

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The Hundredth Monkey (Re-blogged from Ellie’s Blog)

This blog just came to my attention this morning, and its my favorite blog today. Thanks SO much for the re-blog Ellie Haretuko…and for following my blog.

Ellie's Blog

I recently read a study conducted in 1952. Reliability and the actual occurrence of the study even taking place was called into question, that it may just be a myth. Regardless the study enthralled me and mythical or not I enjoyed it. Here’s the gist of it.

Scientists were providing monkeys with sweet potatoes dropping them in the sand for the monkeys to collect. The monkeys loved the potatoes but hated the sand. One of the monkeys realised that she could rectify the problem by washing the sand off in the nearby stream, she taught the other monkeys. Through imitation they were able to learn. Now this in itself isn’t an anomaly, these creatures are intelligent and able to learn. What was surprising was that colonies of monkeys on other islands began doing the exact same thing without any ability to imitate through observation, as they were on neighbouring islands…

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Science lesson for today…ants at work

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1. walking along on my subject search…a team of ants moving an item
ants very good
2. an unidentified object that was obviously important
ants close good
3. something blocking the way
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4. over or under?
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5. get er’ up above
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6. (center of photo) a major hurdle
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7. upsy daisy
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8. let’s go under this leaf
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9.  whew!  good job so far
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10. here’s the tricky part of the job
ants w yellow flower
11. down under the long green leaf, near the flower
ants w flower at destination
12. out of sight alongside the stone

Tile Art

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Here are some pictures that just tugged at me to create while walking through my entry.  They are twelve-inch natural stone tiles.   I never noticed the (featured photo) before, but once the face popped out at me…at least three faces in fact…I knew they were perfect for Cee’s Odd Ball Photo challenge.     The eye just seems to adjust for the scene.

These shots remind me of mountain and desert terrain, the color scheme of the Southwest.      What wonders do YOU see here, boys and girls?   I’d love to hear….

(all photos © Sometimes, 2017)

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tile 1
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tile 2
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tile 3
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tile 4
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tile 5
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tile 6
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tile 8

Ode to a yellow roof, L’Eco

I like to try out new forms of poetry.  A few months ago there was a post by Georgia Bastet, describing a poetic form that she had invented.  Called L’Eco.   There are four stanzas, with a 3-5-4-6-6-3 word count (words, not syllables)… the first and last line in each stanza are the same, plus there is a summary statement in brackets.  The poem was based on a painting by Vincent Van Gogh, in 1889.  I found the poetry form quite challenging, and for a long time I was confused about the structure, so I did not complete my version of L’Eco until recently.    (This image is available through the common domain.)

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Green Wheat Field with  Cypress, Vincent Van Gogh 1889.

A YELLOW ROOF

A yellow roof?
what better chosen color,
an architect’s poetic natural rhythm,
so perfectly Man’s vision of nature
blends rainbow hue of sun-tinted fields…
a yellow roof!

O golden wheat!
staple of life grows joyfully
cycles stand in waiting
green hints at gold at harvest
future fills the miller’s soul with vision
O golden wheat!

Cypress framed landscape…
the hedgerow a hundred greens.
A manor house prevails
overseeing the fruits of the labor
perhaps from within the shade–
Cypress framed landscape!

Pastoral mystic scene…
are those flowers we see?
perhaps daisies…Queen Anne’s Lace?
The eye is the ultimate beholder
beyond the stalks of heading wheat…
Pastoral mystic scene!

An Artist paints Nature into Art:
wheat of gold
cypress frames view
farm land picturesque
A yellow roof!

© Sometimes, 2016