Johnson’s Island confederate cemetery on Lake Erie, Ohio….photos of Southern soldier statue

Here are two photos of the statue at Johnson’s Island, Ohio, taken by Bob Dreger in 1981.   The cemetery is a protected U.S. site, where more than two hundred Confederate military officers are buried.    I do need to clarify that Bob Dreger was the photographer, in 1981.  The copyright  is ©Sometimes, 2017.

This island is far North, half way to Canada.   It was important because all of the prisoners were Confederate military officers (Lieutenant and higher) who were separated from the rank-and-file soldiers incarcerated at Camp Chase, Ohio, and transferred to Johnson’s Island.

Later today I will try to post several more photos from this same batch.

This is the first part of this post on SOMETIMES, photos of the statue itself, including the pedestal, or base, which clearly explains the presence of a Southern monument this far North.   Johnson’s Island is located off of Sandusky, Ohio, in Lake Erie.   The island itself is privately owned, with controlled access.     Visitors to the federal cemetery do have access to the cemetery grounds, however.

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U.S.Civil War. Statue of Confederate Soldier, at Johnson’s Island, Ohio. Photo by Bob Dreger, ©Sometimes, 2017
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Base of Confederate Soldier statue on Johnson’s Island, Ohio, Civil War Prison. ©photo by Bob Dreger, Sometimes 2017)

Rescued Trees

DSC00018.JPG WIDE YARD VIEW
Here are two trees I trimmed to create a base for a trellis; will train the clematis (behind the plastic trellis) to move over.   The obligatory cats are Peggy and Dottie.
DSC00023.JPG TRIMMED SPRUCE TREE
Here’s the huge, homely evergreen tree that I had originally planned to remove entirely, but decided to trim it as shown.   (I admit that it did manage to mask the unattractiveness behind.)
DSC00019.JPG TRIMMED NUT TREE
This new haircut for the nut tree was unplanned; originally the top was slated to be cut off. I like the “umbrella” effect. The purpose here was to control the excessive shade that was affecting my hibiscus.       The big maple in the middle of the photo is on the other side of the yard, had its beginning as a volunteer in a pot.  
DSC00028.JPG TRIMMED MAPLE TOP SKY
This is the maple tree, showing the branch that was not easily reachable with the ladder. I like it this way. This originally started as a volunteer, so persistent that I finally braided it, and now I’ll just see where it wants to go.
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A helicopter, I think maybe the Sheriff, looking around or coming into the airport.

The Naked Ladies in all their glory…

Here are some pics of this gorgeous lily from my daughter’s yard.  I had lots of them, given to me by a neighbor long ago, and there are still a few around from that bunch of bulbs.    Here is a link:  https://www.americanmeadows.com/flower-bulbs/other-spring-flower-bulbs/belladonna-lily to American Meadows’ site featuring these and other plants.   The site also offers fascinating information about the Lillies, and a photo of a spectacular large group planting.

About the Belladonna Lily and its names. This plant is an interesting one. First of all, it’s real name is Amaryllis belladonna, and it’s the only species in the amaryllis genus. This means the Belladonna is the ‘true’ Amaryllis. All those big indoor-blooming things at holiday time are called ‘Amaryllis’ as a common name, but their botanical name is Hippeastrum. (excerpt is from the American Meadows’ site.)

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Real name Belladonna Lily
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Naked Lady is a “true Amarallis.”

 

 

A new leaf shows its color

Some lightening up is in order… despite my penchant for gloom and doom, conspiracy and politics of all descriptions… it is time for me to turn back to my more eclectic blogging themes:    Flowers, poems, camera work, and tales and ideas from the past, rather than disasters and looming political doom.

 

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Mixed Bouquet

 

yellow marigold (close1)
Marigold Detail
marigold bigs
the humble marigold shines

 

orange marig
Imagine these beauties if they were the size of peonies.  
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a fine landing spot, Mr. Bug 
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Where is the Gardener when we need him? 
shasta daisies
Shasta Daisies, a favorite. 
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Queen Anne’s Lace in the garden. 
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Queen Anne’s Lace with Lily 
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Making an entrance. 

 

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Balloon Flower Buds
balloon flower blossom
Ta Da! 
echinacea
Echinacea 
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Earlier development of Marigold plants

[All photos in this post ©Sometimes, 2017.]

 

 

a glimpse of life…passing by (Daily Post Entry: Blur)

<a href=”https://dailypost.wordpress.com/photo-challenges/out-of-focus/”>Focus</a&gt;

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above is a shot taken years ago, in early 1980s, through the window of a van traveling at high speed along a rural road in Yucatan, near the archeological site of Chichén Itza, Mexico.     At first glance it is just a ruined photo, which is often what an amateur photographer gets when shooting on-the-fly from a grimy vehicle window, speeding down a road.    However, on close inspection, the camera apparently focused automatically on the village scene in a clearing beyond the surrounding jungle and captured this candid scene.   (Cropped close-up image below.)   Image by Robert Dreger, ©Sometimes 2017.

village-blur-a-glimpse-of-life-e1497725886780 CROP