No more kittens…but here’s a possibility

 

The latest kittens from next door.   Barbara has been featured in this blog before…she is a rough and tumble lady that appeared from thin air long ago; she lived in the now defunct greenhouse across the road.   Not sure where she lives now, she is very illusive.

[all photos ©Sometimes, 2018}

DSC02549.JPG little grey 3
going next door
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Barbara, an old soldier, three feet, feral, numerous kittens. Bad foot is from being hit by a car, we didn’t know until later.   Approach at yer own risk!
DSC02511.JPG LITTLE GIRL KITTEN 2
Little Sister kitten
DSC02514.JPG BARBARA N LITTLE GREY 2
Barbara & Son
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Here he is: Little Grey
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Little Grey posing
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beautiful markings
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hmmm…what’s over here?
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Nosy Little Grey

A Word About Words From the OED

The Oxford English Dictionary remains THE word bible of the English language.   The OED is available online, with a Word-of-the-Day feature to which one can subscribe without cost.   A full subscription is beyond my budget, and I do respect the OED’s the prohibition against re-posting in its entirety.   Anyone can subscribe to the daily word post  through the OED web site at http://www.oed.com/ to receive the without-cost daily.

Often these selected words grab my attention for various reasons, not only to find out what they mean, but also as discussion topics.

A recent word that intrigued me especially is  —  dis-candy — which means literally liquifying or melting candy (lemon drops, or life savers for example,) from its candied/solid state to the sticky gooey mess that sticks to everything when melted.

Shakespeare used the word to good advantage, with a metaphorical meaning, as taking the overly-sweet or romantic useage of cleaning up “purple prose” or misplaced or just overstated descriptions in a line of poetry or speech.    English teachers often like to “dis-candy” students’ writing.

My wonder isn’t really the word itself, but the prefix (DIS -candy. )    Some substance that starts out as a sticky-sweet solid that  deteriorates into a liquid, or disappears; or a cringe-worthy saccharine sweetness in speech or prose.     Upon consideration I suppose that (DE-candy) would have a different connotation, perhaps meaning some of the  ingredients or adjectives of said substance (i.e. lollypop,) or line of spoken words would be present originally, but removed from the final product never having existed.

Beside the point, neither of my two little desk go-to-dictionaries: The New Oxford Spelling Dictionary, 2014;   nor  The Merriam Webster Dictionary New Edition, 2004 include the word dis-candy.     My criteria for go-to-dictionaries is that they are small paperbacks that sit on a shelf above my computer and can be retrieved with one hand.

 

 

 

 

 

Books of Childhood

In a previous poem I wrote about a gift I received for Christmas, which my mother had concealed in an Oxydol Soap box…a book which our teacher had read out loud to the class.  That book, is called Snow Treasure, by author Marie McSwigan, was first published in 1942.

At age eight or nine I was very impressed with this book about Norwegian children who smuggled their town’s gold down mountain, past occupying German troops,  to a fiord, where an uncle waited with his ship to whisk the treasure away to safety.    The story is said to really have happened.

About 70 years later I obtained a copy of the book that had been discarded by a public library, and available at a book sale.    Marveling at my luck, I quickly paid the pittance asked and left with this great treasure of my own.

 

bringing down the trees: a study in accuracy & precision

I spent most of three days watching the clearing of a 1.8 acre lot which I sold recently.   The operation was both sad and fascinating.   The company that did this work was efficient, the crews worked magnificently together, and the huge trees fell precisely as intended…where they had stood for a hundred years.     (All photos are  my own.)

 

DSC02343.JPG THE LAST APPLE TREE N MY HOUSE
The last apple tree, my house in the background. 

 

DSC02364.JPG VIEW FROM THE LAST APPLE
The last apple tree, facing Southeast.    

 

20180627193349.m2ts STILL OF APPLE TREE(3)
There goes the last tree after it was cut down, on its way to the chipper.

 

DSC02374.JPG TREES STILL THERE
Here is the Eastern corner while some trees on the tree line are still standing.  
DSC02375.JPG VERY GOOD GUY UP IN BUCKET RED SHIRT
Man in red shirt in bucket…others working on downed branches.

 

DSC02376.JPG VERY GOOD SHOT OF TREE GOING TO CHIPPER
Tree top down.  
DSC02410.JPG SAME AS 09 BUT SHOWS CHAIN SAW
Chainsaw dangling from top of crane; dragging tree top to chipper.   The yellow machine is a stump digger, operates by remote control.  The white building is the church.   The clump of ornamental grass in the foreground is on the very edge of the property, so far spared by the operation.  

 

Enter a caption

 

DSC02364.JPG VIEW FROM THE LAST APPLE
Cleared field, the last apple tree standing.   

 

 

20180627193349.m2ts STILL OF APPLE TREE(3)
There goes the last tree after it was cut down, on its way to the chipper.

 

DSC02374.JPG TREES STILL THERE
Here is the Eastern corner while some trees on the tree line are still standing.  
DSC02375.JPG VERY GOOD GUY UP IN BUCKET RED SHIRT
These were healthy old growing trees.
DSC02376.JPG VERY GOOD SHOT OF TREE GOING TO CHIPPER
Excellent team work and organization.  
DSC02410.JPG SAME AS 09 BUT SHOWS CHAIN SAW
Chainsaw hanging down; big log being lowered by chain; branch on way to chipper. 
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This is way the edge looked before the pathway was created. The red ribbons marked the approximate location of the property pin.
DSC02498.JPG APPLE TREE RIP
Tri-corner section.

DSC02493.JPG NORTH TALL TREE LITTLE MACHINES

DSC02418.JPG tree down w dust
Dusty landing… exactly where it was headed.  
DSC02422.JPG the last tree to go
The last tree on the tree line, moments before it came down.  
DSC02431.JPG wrangler w operator
Chomp…moving to chipper.  
DSC02457.JPG LOWERING BIG LOG SEE MAN IN BUCKET
Down comes the log; stump digger waits its turn.

Why is it called Latin America? (re-blog with new title)

Q 1 —Why do we hear so little about countries in Central and South America?

Q 2 — Do citizens of all Latin American nations speak Spanish?

Q 3 — What was the Treaty of Tordesillas?

 

See the source image

 

 

  Q. Why do we hear so little about Latin American countries?  

For one thing, we Americans tend to get our news from a relative few sources, including local television as the most personal news…about our neighborhood, the city, county and state.     Local news bring us details about local sports teams, schools with leaky roofs, who is being arrested or has excelled in something.

The other major news source is cable news like CNN, MSNBC, FOX.  These news networks follow major events around the world—almost always from a standpoint of the United States involvement with the current “newsworthy nation.”    Friends or foes get the news coverage in order of their relative importance to Washington.

Mexico and Canada tend to get the most news coverage, being our immediate neighbors to the north and south.     Other nations, notably Venezuela, which usually has an adversary position with the United States—as one of the chief “bad boys” that are not on the favorites list.    Cuba held that position as thorn-in-the-side for more than half a century, and was rewarded with punative embargoes that tried to crush the island’s fortunes.

Why is it called Latin America?    Because it was dubbed with that name at various times in History, including by Napoleon and Jose Martí (a Cuban writer) and others for various conversational purposes.    The collection of nations included in the designation Latin America were originally settled by the European countries speaking Latin-based (Romance) languages: Spain, England, Portugal, France.       Some of the islands in the Caribbean were originally romance-language speakers after colonialization, although others speak Dutch or English..

The Spanish settled all of the South American continent except Brazil, which was and is Portuguese speaking.

The Treaty of Tordesillas, signed at Tordesillas on June 7, 1494, and authenticated at Setúbal, Portugal, divided the newly discovered lands outside Europe between Portugal and the Crown of Castile, along a meridian 370 leagues west of the Cape Verde islands, off the west coast of Africa.    Following is an excellent Wikipedia.org article about the Treaty of Tordesillas and its lasting influence on the division of the world between the Spanish and Portuguese.   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Tordesillas

Here is an excellent site that I found while researching the above material.  http://www.dosmanosnederland.com/en/index.php    The succinct  but thorough History of Latin America  contained here is highly recommended for the casual interest in the region, and provides a good review and timeline.

U.S. Business as usual in Latin America the age of Trumpism

Ever wonder what is going on down South…way down the continent?

No matter what havoc the US wreaks in the world, it is the same method of operation in Latin America…Imperialism is alive and well.      Our current leadership in Washington is fully involved in the often-nefarious goings-on, not missing a step in the affairs of the Central and South American countries.    The Latin American policies of former administrations: Obama, Bush, Clinton, Bush, etc., etc. back to the dark ages of U.S. history… are intact under Trump.

TeleSur is a Venezuela news site that daily features news of a myriad of developments from an other-than-Washington point of view.    As some of my blogging pals know, my education and background in Latin American History makes me keenly interested in that area of the world.

https://www.telesurtv.net/english/opinion/NicaraguaVenezuela-One-Enemy-One-Fight-For-Democracy-20180526-0024.html

[NOTE:  This particular link is to an opinion piece written for Telesur.   While it is <ahem…opinionated> I recommend it as informative and knowledgeable.]

 

 

Poppies & lilacs & rhododendrons O My!

DSC01981

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Poppy looks real, doesn’t it?  (Yes, it is)   
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Front walk.  Roses on right, Blue Holy on left.   

 

DSC01987
Bob 
DSC01981
Clematis

 

DSC01976
Some kind of berry bush leaning on a tree for support.   

 

DSC01942
Poppy close upEnter a caption

DSC01940

DSC01934
other Peony  

 

DSC01925
glorious peony  
DSC01931
Peony. 
DSC01917
Li’L Kims…  smell divine.

 

DSC01918
Li’l Kim lilacs  
DSC01905
Nice hay field.   I wish the neighbor’s horses could come over.  
DSC01902
Two beauties.  

 

DSC01898
This old plant is a wreck…until its ready to bloom.  

 

ambiguity about volcano

CNN this morning had some breathtaking coverage of the erupting volcano in Hawaii.   The headline or titles on the screen read something like this:

Hawaiian Residents prepare to evacuate

Hawaiian Residents listen for eruptions and dodge lava bombs.

Hmmm, this just begs the question… is it only Residents of Hawaii that are worried about the Volcano?   What about tourists and non-residents that live there?   Non-Hawaiian residents?

 

 

 

A walk with Peggy through nature’s beauty…and the heavy hand of man.

Here are some shots from my walk to the back of our property.    The flowers and trees are glorious this time of year, but as is obvious from some of these pictures the church clean-up crew did not seem to notice.   They wanted to trim the foliage along the highway fence so traffic could see their church.   We refused them access from our side of the fence, but the highway side was pretty well vulnerable to attack…the fence cut and some kind of heavy destruction equipment used to “trim” the trees.    Reminds me for all the world of a small scale Mt. St. Helens after the volcano.

Water droplets sparkle in the greenhouse

We were at the greenhouse today, the first day they were open for the season.  Few plants are ready to show off yet, although there are early bloomers rarin’ to go.  Captivated with these little plants which were still sparkling with water drops after sprinkling.    Sorry I can’t do a retake, this was a once-only shot and I’m disappointed in my photography skills.   The little water drops are visible, but not as charming as they were in person.   Maybe I shouldn’t have used flash?

Sorry for not identifying these plants, I was so taken with the water drops that I forgot to ask what they are.

DSC01816.JPG water droplets (1)
Water drop
DSC01816.JPG water droplets
every little center had its own drop

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impressive

 

DSC01813
lots of bubbles  
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sorry I don’t know the name of these  
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this shot has a little purple and white flower AND a tag  
DSC01812
reminds me a bit of Violets.   
DSC01814
thirsty little guys

 

DSC01817.JPG flats of little plants
twinkle light show